Physical Sciences

Why Go Nano?

Author: 
Eulalia Sui (ASU Graduate Student) & Mr. Brian Fireng (Chandler School District)
Grade Level: 
8th-12th Grade
Standards
National Science Education Standards: 
Science as Inquiry Properties and Changes of Properties in Matter Structure and Properties of Matter
Arizona State Science Education Standards: 
Strand 1: Inquiry Process Concept 1 – Observations, questions, and hypotheses Concept 2 – Scientific Testing Concept 3 – Analysis and Conclusion Concept 4 – Communication Strand 5: Physical Science Concept 1 – Properties and Changes of Properties in Matter Arizona High School Standards: Strand 5: Physical Science Concept 1 – Structure and Properties of Matter
overview: 
Using beads as models for air “filtering” materials, students make observations and construct their own investigation on the effects of altering the amount of available surface areas. The lesson provides an introduction to students on nanotechnology, its benefit in greatly increasing available surface areas, and challenges associated with its application. The lesson also investigates the big idea of form and function.

In the collection of chemical species, particularly those of toxic natures, high sensitivity is key to abstracting all harmful materials. To achieve high sensitivity, scientists are making smaller materials, such as nanoparticles, which yield higher surface areas. The application of these materials, however, poses many challenges.

In the following lesson, students will investigate the pros and cons of going smaller in size.

The proposed lesson plan addresses the inquiry process strands and is intended for 8th grade or higher level courses.

keywords: 
Nanotechnology, Physical Properties, Surface Area, Separation, Filters

Warming up or cooling down

Author: 
Eric Turner
Grade Level: 
7-8
Standards
National Science Education Standards: 
•Abilities of technological design •Understanding about science and technology
Arizona State Science Education Standards: 
• 1SC-E1: Observations, Questions, and Hypotheses - Formulate predictions, questions, or hypotheses based on observations. Locate appropriate resources. • 1SC-E2: Scientific Testing (Investigating and Modeling) - Design and conduct controlled investigations. • 1SC-E3: Analysis and Conclusions - Analyze and interpret data to explain correlations and results; formulate new questions. • 1SC-E4: Communication - Communicate results of investigations. • 2SC-E1: History of Science as a Human Endeavor - Identify individual, cultural, and technological contributions to scientific knowledge. • 3SC-E1: Science and Technology in Society - Develop viable solutions to a need or problem • 5SC-E1: Properties and Changes of Properties in Matter - Understand physical and chemical properties of matter
overview: 
This lab will get students thinking about exothermic and endothermic reactions by student lead designing of experiments to test a large variety of substances to fit a specific application. They will also explore the properties of a commercially available hand warme

Safety
1. Nitrile or Latex gloves should be worn
a. Chemicals are not highly toxic, but must be treated with respect
2. Goggles should be worn
3. Aprons are optional

Time
• One 70-minute class
o Depending on the amount of student led exploration allowed, can be extended to two classes

keywords: 
Endothermic, Exothermic, Reaction

Color, Contrast and Clarity: Exploring the Next Generation of Flexible Color Displays

Author: 
Eric Turner
Grade Level: 
7-8
Standards
National Science Education Standards: 
Physical Sciences Levels 5-8 •Properties and changes of properties of matter. •Transfer of energy
Arizona State Science Education Standards: 
• 1SC-E1: Observations, Questions, and Hypotheses - Formulate predictions, questions, or hypotheses based on observations. Locate appropriate resources. • 1SC-E2: Scientific Testing (Investigating and Modeling) - Design and conduct controlled investigations. • 1SC-E3: Analysis and Conclusions - Analyze and interpret data to explain correlations and results; formulate new questions. • 1SC-E4: Communication - Communicate results of investigations. • 2SC-E1: History of Science as a Human Endeavor - Identify individual, cultural, and technological contributions to scientific knowledge. • 3SC-E1: Science and Technology in Society - Develop viable solutions to a need or problem • 5SC-E1: Properties and Changes of Properties in Matter - Understand physical and chemical properties of matter
overview: 
The lesson can be adjusted to accommodate a wide range of levels of preexisting knowledge. Basic concepts of light, color, and vision are helpful, but shortcomings can be quickly addressed at the start of the lesson

Objective
This lesson can be completed in one or two days. It seeks to introduce and reinforce fundamental concepts in light and energy, as well as expose students to rapidly evolving technology and new engineering challenges. Students will use basic color theory and fluorescent dyes to simulate organic light emitting diode (O-LED) based flexible displays.

Accompanying Documents
1. Supplemental PowerPoint presentation containing
a. Slide on “how we see”
b. Spectrum recording template
c. Display colors for observing
d. Lab questions & answers
e. Follow up assignment

keywords: 
Energy, Light, Spectrum, Color, Engineering Applications

Separation of Mixtures: Properties in Matter

Author: 
Eulalia Sui (ASU Graduate Student) & Mr. Brian Fireng (Chandler School District)
Grade Level: 
8th Grade
Standards
National Science Education Standards: 
Physical Science Content Standard B: Properties of objects and materials
Arizona State Science Education Standards: 
Strand 5: Physical Science Concept 1: Properties and Change of Properties in Matter PO 1. Identify different kinds of matter based on the following physical properties: • States • Boiling point • Solubility PO 5. Classify mixtures as being homogenous or heterogeneous PO 7. Investigate how the transfer of energy can affect the physical and chemical properties of matter
overview: 
In developing sensing devices, a selective medium is usually employed to collect the compound(s) of interest and ease detection. To achieve selectivity, compound(s) of interest must be differentiated from other contaminants. One differentiation mechanism is to make use of the physical properties of the mixture. In the following lesson, students will observe separation of mixtures. Separation will occur based upon differences in physical properties. Two different mixtures are proposed for variation in the depth of content coverage desired and the materials available.
keywords: 
physical property, mixtures, boiling point, states, solubility, transfer of energy
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